Wednesday, 4 May 2016

Sepia Saturday 329 : 7 May 2016


If I could gather my flock around me for a moment, I would like to reveal the theme image for Sepia Saturday 329. Look at that calm and gentle stance, look at all that wool - and I am only talking about the shepherd! In addition you have a sheep, a dog, a crook (I can think of several of my relatives who could fit into that as a theme) and a rustic fence. As usual, Sepia Saturday is bounteous with its potential themes. The theme image is from the collection of the National Media Museum on Flickr and was taken in the 1890s by the photographer Joseph Gale. It is entitled "Ninely and Nine" and if you want to know why you can read more about the image HERE. As always, all you need to do is to post your post on or around Saturday 7th May 2016 and add a link to the list below.

And here is a preview of the next couple of Sepia Saturday prompts.




We are working our way towards the end of Marilyn's set of prompts (and the end of the theme within a theme whatever that was) and I am starting to put together the set of Sepia prompts for the next quarter (July - September 2016). For the first month, I have chosen old photographs from within my own collection and I am in the process of adding these to the Sepia Saturday Flickr Group site. I should have finished the five for July by next week so you may want to take a look (I will provide a link then for those who aren't already in the group). If you think it is a good idea, what I would rather like to do is to get a couple of volunteers who would add theme images from their own collections which would cover August and September. You would need to add the four images to the SS Flickr Group, make them copyright free and add a description. And remember, the images will need something within them that can be interpreted as prompts for Sepians. Have a think about it.

That is far too much thinking for one week, it is now time to be gathered safely in for Sepia Saturday 329. Baaa.




17 comments:

Little Nell said...

Feeling sheepish!

Mike Brubaker said...

I've a busy weekend so I'm early for once. I've got no sheeps or dogs, but I do have a beard!

Helen Killeen Bauch McHargue said...

A herd of goats visits us regularly trying to eat my passion fruit which grow on a wire fence
dividing our property from our neighbors. They're frisky little creatures and soooo energetic.
It's hard to believe the scrubby plants they survive on contain that much nourishment.
It's delightful to watch them all run in one direction, turn on a dime and run in another
based on whistles and sounds coming from the herder who we rarely see, but can
usually hear.



















































































































La Nightingail said...

Two well known shepherd folk come to mind . . .

boundforoz said...

Alan mentioned a flock of sheep but the nearest I can find is a flock of men and their involvement with my home town history.

tony said...

Yorkshire Sheep Rule!

ScotSue said...

A mixture of thoughts and memories on sheep,

Barbara Fisher said...

My great-great grandfather had a beard, so he and a few other English country folk feature in my post.

Deb Gould said...

By hook or by crook...

Jo Featherston said...

Just a random selection of sheep and goat photographs from various countries from me this week, as I'm travelling and don't have access to my photo albums, but in any event the topic of sheep has come up before, so I've used some other family-related photographs with sheep in past blogs.

Barbara Rogers said...

Various fences, or railings, and one little lamb of an animal who's actually feline.

Dara said...

Photos (my own) and stories of an area of sheep grazing land where my family lived in the 19th century.

Bob Scotney said...

Deb has used 'my' title. Leg of lamb for lunch tomorrow.

Titania Staeheli said...

Shepherding a tough life.

Jodi Lynn Strait said...

No sheep, but dairy farming can be tough….

Chill Fox Media said...

There's a rather large furry animal in my post this week.

Anne Young said...

A rather late response. My husband's great great grandfather worked as a shepherd.