Wednesday, 5 April 2017

Sepia Saturday 362 : 8 April 2017



Our Sepia Saturday theme image this week is taken from the fascinating collection of old glass negatives which were taken by the Sutton photographer, David Knights-Wittome (1876-1943). This collection has recently been digitised and they are held at the Sutton Local Studies and Archives Centre (further information about the collection can be found on the Past On Glass website). We would like to thank the Sutton Collection for permission to use their images here on Sepia Saturday. 

The subject of the photograph is, of course, three choirboys, and you are free to interpret the prompt in whichever way you want. Simply post your post on or around Saturday 8th April and add a link to the list below. Here is a quick preview of the next two Sepia Saturday theme prompts.






11 comments:

Helen Killeen Bauch McHargue said...

I'm leaving on a vacation. Trios have been on my mind. Going, going, gone!!!

La Nightingail said...

Who knew construction paper and glue would hold up so well for 53 years and counting! :)

ScotSue said...

Choir boys meant churches, so here is a profile of the church at the heart of my ancestral trail, with lots of famiiy connections - St. Chad's at Poulton-le-Fylde, Lancashire.

Jo Featherston said...

Off for the weekend, so just a short post from me this week, nothing religious but instead including a couple of threesomes.

Wendy said...

Just a quick story about my dad as an altar boy. Cute photo though ~

Barbara Rogers said...

Some choirs I've shared this week...photos don't do justice to the beautiful music however!

Mike Brubaker said...

I have postcard photo that's kind of close to the theme. Musical of course.

Jenny said...

Not quite a choir, or real altar boys for that matter!

Lorraine Phelan said...

A trio of damaged photos of trios.

Little Nell said...

Three choirboys inspired by three choirboys.

Mike Brubaker said...

Beautiful! The voice of course is the universal instrument and the angelic sound of a boy soprano has been admired since pre-history. In the Renaissance it was even halted from the changes of puberty by the horrible practice of castration. Yet Handel and Monteverdi wrote some of their greatest works for castrati singers.

The high treble timbre of boy sopranos is not displayed well in a television or recording studio. Liturgical choral music really needs a long reverberation time from tall vaulted cathedral walls to be at its best.

I suspect the popularity of Ernest Lough's recordings came from the public's need for music's consolation in the post-war years. Yet I wonder if the sound of a boy soprano may have been too painful for your grandparents. A sad history to share, thank you.