Thursday, 11 November 2010

Sepia Saturday Week 49


I'm back, and I'm glad to say that the automatic posting seems to have worked during my absence and Sepia Saturday is still alive and well and living in a memory near you. This first week back - and the run up to our 50th Sepia Saturday Call - provides me with an opportunity to welcome any new participants and try to answer some of the questions about Sepia Saturday that have been posed over recent weeks. So here goes :

Sepia Saturday is a Blog meme open to anyone who wants to participate. There are few, if any, rules and if you want to take part all you need do is to add a Sepia Saturday post to your blog and then link it to the Linky List that appears on this Sepia Saturday Blog each week. If possible try to link to the actual Sepia Saturday post rather than the Blog itself, but if you can't manage that, don't worry too much about it. Try to publish your post as near as possible to Saturday, but if you can't manage the exact day, don't worry too much about it (as you will have gathered by now, Sepia Saturday doesn't go in for worry).

The basic ingredients of a Sepia Saturday post are an image plus words. The image doesn't have to be sepia: the sepia part of the title relates to age rather than colour. Equally the image doesn't have to be particularly old: after all, what is old to a mayfly is young to an oak tree. It can be of a person, or a place, or an object, or ... whatever you like. All we ask is that it is somehow evocative of a memory or of a time. The words will help to explain why the image is evocative, but they can be as few or as many as you wish. 

If you are still in doubt, have a look at what others do, for it is the participants who make the rules and like all good rules they change and evolve all the time. When you have posted your Sepia Saturday contribution and linked it to the Linky List, try to return to this Blog and look at as many other Sepia Saturday contributions as you can. You will quickly find that we are quite a pleasant lot and we take pleasure in the memories and images we share with each other.

So, roll up, roll up for Sepia Saturday 49 which will take place on or around Saturday 13th November 2010. The image at the top of this post is taken from an old postcard of the seaside town of Bridlington on the Yorkshire coast. I remember this scene well from my own childhood, but what intrigued me most of all was the building on the left of the image with the prominent sign advertising "snaps". I have written on Sepia Saturday before about the great old seaside tradition of having photographs (snaps) taken on holiday, but if you examine the photograph very carefully (you will need to click on it to enlarge it) you will see that it is also advertising something that looks very much like "Snapets". I have no idea what there were, but I quite like the idea of snapets (or maybe the word was snapettes). So, don't forget, start posting your photos, your snaps and your snapets now and join in the great Sepia Saturday show.

12 comments:

NatureFootstep said...

your photo really has a great sepia tone. It looks good.

CrazyasaCoolFox said...

I have a special post for Canadians. Warm and fuzzy:)

Marilyn said...

My post shows the importance of holding on to those photos that are unnamed.

www.dakotaboo.com said...

Just uploaded my brief sepia entry for this week.

Pat transplanted to MN said...

so good to be back among the Sepia posters. Had a tough time choosing but will get to more on the weeks ahead....

TICKLEBEAR said...

I'M IN!!
can't visit today but will soon...
PROMISE!!
:)~
HUGZ

tony said...

Welcome Back Alan.

Christine H. said...

I, well, what can I say? I have a post about a dog or about Paris - or about both.

Bob Scotney said...

Christine H's post 'To Amy from Paris' is what led me here. See my Amy.

Kristin said...

Well, I just put up two sepia saturday posts - one on each blog. I like looking and posting here.

imagespast said...

Perhaps if you didn't have time for a full Snap in Bridlington, you got a Snappette?

whowerethey said...

I wonder if a snapette was one of those tiny portraits that were popular in the 40s and 50s?